Femara for PCOS Women Might Be Better than Clomid?

by PCOS Editor

This site recently published a newsletter article that talked about some research suggesting that for women with PCOS, tamoxifen might be a good alternative to Clomid, since Clomid does not always work. Clomid is a drug used to induce ovulation.

Tamoxifen is a drug used to treating breast cancer. Because it is used for breast cancer, several readers had some very negative comments. They thought it was hypocritical and disgusting to write an article that seemed to promote the use of tamoxifen.

On the other hand, another person said this: "I have used Clomid/Metformin one time for a pregnancy. The second time we tried it, for 4 months, it just did not work. We switched to the breast cancer drug, Femara, in combination with Metformin, and I got pregnant 2 times with it. I would recommend it to anyone especially if you have PCOS because Femara, unlike Clomid, has practically a zero chance of a multiple birth which someone with PCOS would want to avoid."

Other readers weighed in with their thoughts and comment, shown below.

Comments for Femara for PCOS Women Might Be Better than Clomid?

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Thanks for the newsletter article
by: Laura

I am thrilled with the last 2 paragraphs of your response to everyone that "complained" about the Breast Cancer drug article!

You are 100% correct! People will absolutely look for the path of least resistance!

Thank you for ALL of your information and what you are doing with your newsletter! I have referred SO many people to this newsletter. It is VERY encouraging to have information about this stinkin' disease! I am one of the ones that "tried everything" and only got pregnant once and lost that baby, adopted an awesome daughter and THEN... I lost 40lbs and changed my habits and guess what... I have an almost 3 year old little boy that is my second miracle!!!

Keep up the good work, my friends!!!

Y'all ROCK!!!!

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Your PCOS Newsletter Is Very Informative
by: Anonymous

Personally I am not disgusted nor disappointed with the femara article. I am very grateful that you have taken the time to research an illness that so many of us suffer from. Without your research, I have very little information on this illness and quite frankly there are very few doctors that believe that PCOS is an issue.

I would like to say this to all those women out there that like to complain about your research –

“Nobody is forcing you to do anything you don’t want to do. This is just information and at the end of the day it is your choice whether to follow or disregard this information. Bill is doing this in his own time, and as far as I know, he is not receiving personal nor financial gain from distributing, what I personally feel, is a very useful and informative newsletter. If you don’t like it, don’t read it. If you find that you disagree with some of the information, it is not necessary to launch an attack but rather be polite and disagree respectfully. I personally am grateful for the new research that Bill sources. He does not only present new accurate information but also has many solutions. If you choose to follow his advice, do so properly. Follow the correct diet & take the supplements! You will see results! Thanks to Bill, he is providing us with the information to allow us to make an informed decision on what path to follow. Own your decision – You made it!”

Thank you Bill! Please continue to send out this newsletter. Yes, there are articles from time to time that I don’t particularly agree with (like the cancer drug) but that is my personal opinion on it. It is not my place to judge someone who does decide to try that treatment. I understand being in a place of desperation, and taking extreme measures to fall pregnant. I have been there myself. I was fortunate to reap the benefits of natural medication (most of which you have discussed in your articles). I find myself in a similar place of desperation with regards to my weight – I have however come to terms with the fact that natural supplements along with diet will keep me healthy which far outranks being sexy

On another note, My Doctor (Naturopath) is now treating me for the following:
Adrenal Gland
T3 Thyroid
Metal Poisoning (probably the source of my intense migraines)
Diet (increasing the “good” cholesterol in my diet)

If you have any insight into these areas I’d love to hear about it!

Best wishes!

Jacque

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Off-Label Fertility Drugs
by: Cassie

Wow. Lots of drugs are used for off-label purposes. I can't imagine anyone being disgusted by the suggestion of taking a cancer drug if it means they could be blessed with a child when other methods have failed. I wouldn't trade anything for the kisses I get every morning. To each his own. And I could tell you of a handful of others who would say the same thing.

In regards to Femara and what I learned about it, it can cause birth defects IF you take it while pregnant, but that's the reason you're taking it, because you are not pregnant. And every time I took it and Clomid as well, I took a pregnancy test on CD5 to make sure that I was not pregnant even though I had just had my period. Femara is taken on CD 5-9, similar to Clomid. By the time you ovulate around CD 13-14, Femara is out of your system. The same can't be said for Clomid. It is still in your system at ovulation and during the fertiization period, In that respect, I would consider Femara the safer option. Maybe people are thinking that because it is a breast cancer drug, that it is highly toxic or something like that. My understanding is that it is an enzyme inhibitor which acts on your hormones so hopefully people are reacting off the cuff because they just don't understand the science.

I hear my kisses calling. Blessings to you for sharing this newsletter. Boo to the haters!!


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Femara is non-invasive like Clomid
by: Carrie

I think it's ridiculous that people are getting worked up over the information presented in the newsletter.

Educate yourself, decide what your goals are and work with your doctor to decide a course of treatment.

Some people are the "picture of health" but still cannot get pregnant...in which case, they can choose treatments.

Femara is a very non-invasive treatment similar to Clomid which often results in pregnancy. It has been used safely for infertility for over a decade.

Just because it is also used to treat breast cancer does not put it in the same class as chemo, radiation or other cancer treatments. Which came first? The chicken or the egg...if someone had discovered Femara for infertility first, we'd be saying "scientists have discovered that the infertility drug, Femara, has also proved to be beneficial in treating breast cancer."

I'd suggest to those who use this newsletter as their only means of information/education re: PCOS to dig deeper.

Your information is great, but, it's surface material and encourages us to take it with a grain of salt or dig deeper. Thanks for putting it together for us each month.

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Breast Cancer Drug
by: Bonnie

In your newsletter I read that some people were offended by your inclusion of the breast cancer drug information. I was surprised by this.

Personally, I was intrigued by the drug information because I am always on the lookout for anything that appears to help PCOS - not because I am trying to get pregnant but because (as a future nurse practitioner who wants to specialize in endocrinology and fertility) I am most interested in figuring out the etiology of PCOS.

So any information - whether it's related to natural treatments or pharmaceuticals or things like exercise or stress reduction - anything - that shows promise for treating PCOS leads to an understanding of what causes PCOS, and that gives me something to go on in finding treatments and methods that I want to try. Leads, if you will, to the heart of the matter.

So if we figure out that a drug helps PCOS, we can figure out why it helps, hopefully - what mechanism that drug uses toward the metabolic syndrome - and then if we personally do not want to use drugs, we can find something natural that would emulate what the drug does or modify our behaviors so as to eliminate the need for a drug or a supplement at all.

What we need to do is figure out the intricate details, and then we can find solutions and tailor treatments to work for those who want drugs or who don't want drugs or whatever the situation is.

That's the ticket in my book - figuring out what really makes PCOS tick. I read everything I can get my hands on about PCOS and I have personally successfully treated myself...I want to know everything I can about it so I can help others when I get the chance. Knowledge-based, purposeful action is powerful. So please keep the info coming!

Thanks!
Bonnie

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